Wednesday, August 23, 2017

#BookQW today's word is FAST. They'd grown close, so fast. #Tirgearr #RomanticSuspense

Since his divorce, Grady Fletcher had his share of one-nighters, and he'd enjoyed them thoroughly. But it had never been like this. He and Tori had grown close, so fast.

From Unholy Alliance, book 2 of the Donahue Cousins series.


Saturday, August 19, 2017

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

#Tirgearr #amwriting my work-in-progress alternative slang #Hawaii

My work-in-progress, Bittersweet Alliance, follows Hawaiian heroine, Jolene Kualoha.  The book takes place on the Big Island where she grew up.  Locals rarely swear even if, like Jolene, she’s spent time stateside.  Instead of saying a word such as shit, a Hawaiian would say, Pelapela (filthy, nasty) or Pilau (putrid).  The word, Fuck, does not exist in Hawaiian. The closest is Ahi (oh no, ouch).  As authors we know readers tire of translations, and I gave Jolene English language slang such as:  Fudge nuggets, Cheese ‘n rice, Good Night, Son of a Monkey, Mothersmucker, Bullspit, Cornnuts, Fishpaste, I don’t give a Donald Duck, Frack, Shifty, fungicidal.  Bittersweet Alliance will be full length romantic suspense, and maybe she’ll say quite of few of these along the way. 

Sunday, August 13, 2017

#amwriting #authortips #pointofview Camera on the head technique makes it simple to grasp

If you've written a book of fiction and want your readers to keep reading, one slip of point of view hurts a story, but several slips are fatal. How to Write Point of View is now on audible, read by Chelsea Carpenter. 



Point of view, the position of the narrator in relation to the story, is at the heart of romance fiction. Aspire to write effective POV, and inspiration for your romance novel will follow. 
You will succeed with my "camera on the head" technique!  Put an imaginary video camera on top of your POV character’s head and write from his or her perspective.  You, the author, will unfold the story by filtering events through "the eyes" of a character. A reader wants to connect with the character with the most to lose in a scene. The character's reactions are revealed. A character can observe an event and react to it.  As the character's feelings are disclosed to the reader, the author provides an emotional identification.  As a writer, you do not want to switch viewpoints midstream within a scene. Some authors keep a consistent viewpoint within an entire chapter.  In any case, within a scene or even a chapter, the viewpoint character exposes his or her soul so that the reader is immersed in the emotional drama of the moment.  The character reacts internally.  This can include reacting to another character's joy, grief, anger, giving the reader a jolt.  Keep the POV consistent by listening to your characters. Turn off all the other voices and listen only to them. If they tell you they want to do something insane, put that on the page. If they tell you they want to say something outrageous, put that on the page. Are you writing a romance? If they tell you they would rather kiss chastely than make love athletically on the floor, give them that chaste kiss. If they tell you a chaste kiss isn’t nearly enough, then you’d better get them down on that floor, and you can keep the video camera in place.  What do they see? We'll go from there. 



  







Monday, August 7, 2017

#amwriting #authortips #Tirgearr author Are you writing a series?

Are you writing a series? That’s great because after readers finish a good book, they look forward to more from you.  I’d like to share my tips.

Each book in a series must be a stand-alone.  There can be an open-ended question, and I deliver the answer in the next book. Some authors who write a series have a mystery arching over the entire series that is answered in the final book. 
If your series involves one character or a couple, write a happily for now ending rather than a happily ever after.  My method is to change up the hero and heroine by writing a series with male cousins.  This ensures some consistency across the series because the heroes are ex-military, honorable and courageous.  As a writer of a series you need to keep track of the family tree, physical attributes, and locations.  Consider using an Excel spreadsheet to maintain details.  In my case I need to know ages of the characters and stomping grounds of their childhoods.
Consider what is logical.   You’ve created a certain community and premise and must keep actions plausible.  The technology your characters use reflects the world they live in.  Their dialect must be consistent. Are they middle class or are they millionaires?

Have fun with your book series.